Special Education

Courses

Mathematics

Math 7

Math 7.

Math 7 covers all the Math 7 standards. The instructional time is focused on four critical areas: (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships, including percentages; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples. Students also work towards fluently solving multi-step equations with rational coefficients. Upon completion of this course, students are adequately prepared for Math 8 the following year.

Math 8

Math 8.

Math 8 covers all the Math 8 standards. instructional time is focused on three critical areas: (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; (3) analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem. Students also work towards fluency with solving simple sets of two equations with two unknowns by inspection. Upon completion of this course, students will be adequately prepared for Algebra 1 in 9th grade.

Math Practices

The 8 Standards of Mathematical Practices

The following list, known as the 8 Standards of Mathematical Practice, are the "habits of mind" that La Paz math students posses. These mathematical practices are married to the content standards and our daily learning objectives.

The 8 Standards Mathematical Practice:

  1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them
  2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively
  3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others
  4. Model with mathematics
  5. Use appropriate tools strategically
  6. Attend to precision
  7. Look for and make use of structure
  8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

"The Standards for Mathematical Practice describe ways in which developing student practitioners of the discipline of mathematics increasingly ought to engage with the subject matter as they grow in mathematical maturity and expertise throughout the elementary, middle and high school years."

-Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, page 8

Homework

Social Science

7th grade

7th Grade

Textbook used: Medieval to Early Modern Times, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2006.

Additional sources are selected by the teachers to enhance the curriculum.

The 7th grade units of study address the year-long inquiry question: How did the distant regions of the World become more interconnected through time?

  • Thinking like a Historian
  • Islamic World
  • West African Civilizations
  • China
  • Japan
  • Europe
  • Americas

8th grade

8th Grade

Textbook used: United States History Independence to 1914, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2006.

Additional sources are selected by the teachers to enhance the curriculum.

The 8th grade units of study address the year-long inquiry question: What does Freedom mean to the Nation's founders and how did it change over time?

  • Colonial Era
  • Revolutionary Era
  • Constitution Unit
  • New Nation
  • Age of Jackson
  • Westward Expansion
  • North and South
  • Causes of the Civil War
  • Civil War
  • Reconstruction Unit
  • Industrial Revolution

State Standards

Visit the following links to learn more information about the Framework and the Standards for 7th grade History.

7th Grade

Textbook used: Medieval to Early Modern Times, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2006.

Additional sources are selected by the teachers to enhance the curriculum.

The 7th grade units of study address the year-long inquiry question: How did the distant regions of the World become more interconnected through time?

  • Thinking like a Historian
  • Islamic World
  • West African Civilizations
  • China
  • Japan
  • Europe
  • Americas


8th Grade

Textbook used: United States History Independence to 1914, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2006.

Additional sources are selected by the teachers to enhance the curriculum.

The 8th grade units of study address the year-long inquiry question: What does Freedom mean to the Nation's founders and how did it change over time?

  • Colonial Era
  • Revolutionary Era
  • Constitution Unit
  • New Nation
  • Age of Jackson
  • Westward Expansion
  • North and South
  • Causes of the Civil War
  • Civil War
  • Reconstruction Unit
      • ses of the Civil War
      • Civil WarReconstruction Unit
        • Industrial Revolution7th GradeTextbook used: Medieval to Early Modern Times, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2006.

          The 8th grade units of study address the year-long inquiry question: What does Freedom mean to the Nation's founders and how did it change over time?
          • Colonial Era
          • Revolutionary Era
          • Constitution Unit
          • New Nation
          • Age of
          • Industrial Revolution7th GradeTextbook used: Medieval to Early Modern Times, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2006.

            Additional sources are selected by the teachers to enhance the curriculum.

            The 7th grade units of study address the year-long inquiry question: How did the distant regions of the World become more interconnected through time?
            • Thinking like a Historian
            • Islamic World
            • West African Civilizations
            • China
            • Japan
            • Europe
            • Americas

English Language Arts 7/8

English 7

Trimester 1

*Elements of the Short Story- class notes

*Short Stories

*Grammar/Usage

*Composition: Narrative

Trimester 2

  • A Christmas Carol
  • Grammar/Usage
  • Research skills
  • Composition: Argument
  • Novel Unit- The Outsiders

Trimester 3

  • Poetry
  • Grammar/Usage
  • Composition: Informational writing
  • Poetry and creative writing
  • Speech

English 8

Trimester 1

This year in Trimester One English, we will be using the online textbook called StudySync. Through StudySync, we can provide students with a variety of excerpts, short stories, and current, nonfiction articles. Students are also able to highlight and annotate directly within a text.

Students will also be writing personal narratives as they explore and learn about their names. Modeled in a vignette by Sandra Cisneros, students get to discover the feelings, memories, and histories attached to their names. Afterwards, they create visual word art that represents who they are and how they see themselves.

As we move forward through narrative writing, we will learn to analyze how authors create suspense. Students will research a specific author to discover the writer’s craft.

Finally, students will create their own “blast” article. They will write about how authors are able to effectively create suspense, making a more intriguing piece of literature.

Trimester 2

In the second trimester, we focus on argumentative writing, beginning with a unit on animal testing. Students often find this topic interesting; many end up changing their minds as they discover new arguments for and against animal testing.

We then transition to a “Civil Rights” unit, focusing on the movement towards civil disobedience. We analyze several nonfiction pieces by Sojourner Truth, Dr. Martin Luther King, Malala Yousafzai, Mahatma Gandhi, and more. The students are challenged to come up with their own definitions of what makes for a civil society.

Trimester 3

As we wind up the year, we dive into WWII and its implications on our own world today. We search for answers to such questions as: How did the Holocaust happen? What is a dystopia, and can it exist today? We study such works as Anne Frank (the play), The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, and Prisoner B-3087. The students will be given choices to read that fit their interest. We also look at propaganda and discover its effects on society as a whole.

One of the highlights of the year is our trip to the Museum of Tolerance. Every year, students have the opportunity to explore the museum and learn more about both tolerance and the Holocaust.

Classroom Expectations

Classroom Expectations

To ensure a productive learning environment, we support and enforce the school-wide positive behavior system in the classroom. Across campus and especially in our classroom, the basic expectations for all students fall into three main categories: Responsibility, Respect, and Readiness. We expect all students to:

  • Listen to and follow all directions.
  • Bring all required materials to class each day (see material requirements).
  • Be seated and ready to begin when the bell rings.
  • Listen quietly when the teacher or another student is speaking.
  • Participate in class activities in a cooperative and contributive manner.
  • Follow the district’s academic code of honor. Cheating/copying will result in a zero for the assignment and an N or U in citizenship. Refer to page 19-20 in the student planner for detailed information.
  • Absolutely NO gum on campus!
  • Bell to bell, no cell unless a staff member gives permission.

Classroom Materials

We expect all students to come to school prepared with basic tools for study. The following supplies are necessary to be successful in my classroom:

  • Student planner
  • Pocket folder for English materials only
  • Pencils (sharpened) or mechanical
  • Pens (blue/black and red)
  • Highlighters (3 or more colors)
  • Lined notebook paper
  • At Home Reading book
  • Earbuds for listening to videos online
  • Colored post-it notes
  • Scissors, glue stick, and tape
  • Hand sanitizer and tissues

Science

NGSS

We are proud to announce that we have been implementing NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards) for the last three years. While we are continuing to strive for the vision of NGSS, all middle schools science units are fully aligned to the new standards. The staff at La Paz believe that NGSS engages and challenges students to be better learners. Walk into any of the science teachers rooms and you will see all dimensions of NGSS in action.

7th/8th Grade Standards

7th Grade

  • Earth Moves and Shifts
  • Everything's the Matter
  • The Real World Wide Web
  • Utilizing Resources
  • Catastrophic Changes of State

8th Grade

  • Gravity in the Universe
  • Electric and Magnetic Forces
  • Colliding Objects
  • Observing Waves on Earth
  • Exploring Evidence of Earth's History
  • Sources of Genetic Modifications
  • Our Impact as Humans

Supplies

  • College ruled spiral notebook (150 pages) Pages must be 8 1/2 x 11
  • Pencils and erasers
  • set of colored pencils
  • small pencil sharpener for colored pencils
  • 3 different colored highlighters
  • glue stick

Lab Safety

Classroom Laboratory Safety

A teacher may remove any student at any time for any behavior that endangers themselves and others.

1. Equipment stays in the classroom.

2. Clean all equipment and return them as directed by teacher.

3 Keep chemicals away from eyes, nose, mouth, clothing and skin.

4. Use chemicals only from clearly marked containers or as directed by teacher.

5. Measure chemicals at the supply table and atke back to station as directed by teacher.

6. Always replace caps, covers, and stoppers on chemical containers immediately.

7. Mix chemicals according to instructions.

8. Wipe up spills immediately.

9. Keep the open end of a test tube pointed away from you and anyone else when heating it.

10. Report any accidents to teacher immediately.

11. Throw away waste materials into proper containers according to teacher instructions.

12. Goggles MUST be worn whenever you are working with chemicals, heating materials, or you could be harmed by flying objects.

13. Wash your hands at the end of each laboratory period.

14. Never heat a sealed container.

15. Student with long hair myst tie it back when working with an open flame.

16. Keep aisles and walkways clear of backpacks, binders and papers. All school materials should be placed under the tables.

17. Keep your movement around the room to a minimum. Stay at your lab station or seat unless directed by the teacher.

18. DO NOT SMELL OR TOUCH CHEMICALS UNLESS DIRECTED OTHERWISE. Use the wafting technique to smell chemicals when necessary.

19. STUDENTS SHOULD NEVER BEHAVE IN A MANNER THAT CAN CAUSE AN ACCIDENT.




Teacher Contact

Autism Program

Description

7th-8th grade.
This program is designed specifically for students with Autism who require more support than is available in a general education or BASIC class. Generally, students have behaviors and learning needs on the moderate to severe side of the spectrum. Students may be verbal or non-verbal. Students may have communication devices (such as an iPad for example) that help them to communicate their wants and needs. Students receive APE services twice a week, as determined by their IEP, as well as PE with the Autism class on non-APE days. ALL classwork is considered modified, as students are not working with the same curriculum as their general education peers. The curriculum for this class is Unique Learning Systems (ULS), a program chosen and paid for by the district. This program covers all curricular areas (Language Arts, Math, Social Science, Science, Vocational, Social). Some students are able to go out to general education and/or BASIC classes, as determined by their needs, abilities, and the IEP team. Students have access to all DIS services (OT, APE, Speech/Language). Community Based Instruction is part of the program, though not weekly.

Teacher Contact

Services